Tricia Ennis

I take photos, make videos, and design websites, but mostly I just talk ... a lot.

"Tiger Lily Doesn't Equal Human Torch" plus a very long rant

thisfeliciaday:

image

The other day I posted this tweet:

"Wait they cast a white chick for Tiger Lily in the new Peter Pan? Did they not remember Lone Ranger last year? Or, you know, racism?"

(If you didn’t hear, Rooney Mara is supposedly playing Tiger Lily, who is a princess of the “Native” tribe, in the…

edwardspoonhands:

fishingboatproceeds:

So for those unfamiliar with the situation: Grace Helbig is a brilliant online video creator and could until recently be found at the DailyGrace channel.
But that channel, and all the videos on it, were not owned by Grace. They were owned by a company, My Damn Channel.
Now, in order to have ownership and control over her stuff, she has to leave the channel that she built up to 2.5 million subscribers and start over on YouTube. 
But her viewers—and the YouTube community at large—has rallied around Grace as a creator: Her new channel already has over 230,000 subscribers (JOIN US). This is Tim’s real sister.
Meanwhile, the DailyGrace channel, which will now feature reruns of old Grace videos for which she will be (I assume) paid nothing, has lost more than 100,000 subscribers in the past week. This is Tim’s corporate entity sister.
Here’s the lesson: Many corporations think that by owning YouTube channels, they’ll have something valuable. But the value is not in the channel or in the number of subscribers. On YouTube, despite the corporatization of everything, the value is in people.
I’m not a DailyGrace fan. I’m a Grace Helbig fan. And at least on YouTube, the individual still has more power than the corporation. 
That’s worth celebrating. 
p.s. Subscribe to Grace! (The person, not the corporate entity.)

I actually had a business person in LA (fairly well known so I’m not going to use his name) say to me “The problem with online video is that the creators have all the power.” And I was like “You mean ‘the great thing about online video’ right?”
His point was the conversion of online video into a big, fancy, multi-billion dollar industry was being slowed (even halted) by the fact that online video really is largely about personal connections between individuals and their audiences…that’s something that’s very difficult to fake. It’s hard for companies to add enough value to justify owning the content (or even a portion of it) when communities actually end up enjoying simpler videos more than expensive, elaborate ones. 
My point is that THAT IS SO COOL AND WE ARE SO LUCKY TO BE A PART OF IT! If no one makes a billion dollars, I think that’s probably OK.

I do see his point though, from a wider, more overarching “digital content distribution” perspective.
While it’s awesome and wonderful that the whole online video market is sort of proving the idea that a connected community is more powerful than any gimmick, it poses an issue for getting larger, more involved (production-wise) content out there. I think the fact that the online community is much more drawn to the smaller, simpler content and content creators, and the fact that tapping into that is very difficult for a corporate entity (without it feeling like they’re, for lack of a better word, violating the whole thing) is the reason why we haven’t seen a greater push for longer form content on the web.The whole content creator vs corporate identity issue will have to find some sort of middle ground before we can really starting using the web-based media platform to it’s greatest potential.
At least, in my opinion.

edwardspoonhands:

fishingboatproceeds:

So for those unfamiliar with the situation: Grace Helbig is a brilliant online video creator and could until recently be found at the DailyGrace channel.

But that channel, and all the videos on it, were not owned by Grace. They were owned by a company, My Damn Channel.

Now, in order to have ownership and control over her stuff, she has to leave the channel that she built up to 2.5 million subscribers and start over on YouTube. 

But her viewers—and the YouTube community at large—has rallied around Grace as a creator: Her new channel already has over 230,000 subscribers (JOIN US). This is Tim’s real sister.

Meanwhile, the DailyGrace channel, which will now feature reruns of old Grace videos for which she will be (I assume) paid nothing, has lost more than 100,000 subscribers in the past week. This is Tim’s corporate entity sister.

Here’s the lesson: Many corporations think that by owning YouTube channels, they’ll have something valuable. But the value is not in the channel or in the number of subscribers. On YouTube, despite the corporatization of everything, the value is in people.

I’m not a DailyGrace fan. I’m a Grace Helbig fan. And at least on YouTube, the individual still has more power than the corporation. 

That’s worth celebrating. 

p.s. Subscribe to Grace! (The person, not the corporate entity.)

I actually had a business person in LA (fairly well known so I’m not going to use his name) say to me “The problem with online video is that the creators have all the power.” And I was like “You mean ‘the great thing about online video’ right?”

His point was the conversion of online video into a big, fancy, multi-billion dollar industry was being slowed (even halted) by the fact that online video really is largely about personal connections between individuals and their audiences…that’s something that’s very difficult to fake. It’s hard for companies to add enough value to justify owning the content (or even a portion of it) when communities actually end up enjoying simpler videos more than expensive, elaborate ones. 

My point is that THAT IS SO COOL AND WE ARE SO LUCKY TO BE A PART OF IT! If no one makes a billion dollars, I think that’s probably OK.

I do see his point though, from a wider, more overarching “digital content distribution” perspective.

While it’s awesome and wonderful that the whole online video market is sort of proving the idea that a connected community is more powerful than any gimmick, it poses an issue for getting larger, more involved (production-wise) content out there. 

I think the fact that the online community is much more drawn to the smaller, simpler content and content creators, and the fact that tapping into that is very difficult for a corporate entity (without it feeling like they’re, for lack of a better word, violating the whole thing) is the reason why we haven’t seen a greater push for longer form content on the web.

The whole content creator vs corporate identity issue will have to find some sort of middle ground before we can really starting using the web-based media platform to it’s greatest potential.

At least, in my opinion.

fishingboatproceeds:

So for those unfamiliar with the situation: Grace Helbig is a brilliant online video creator and could until recently be found at the DailyGrace channel.
But that channel, and all the videos on it, were not owned by Grace. They were owned by a company, My Damn Channel.
Now, in order to have ownership and control over her stuff, she has to leave the channel that she built up to 2.5 million subscribers and start over on YouTube. 
But her viewers—and the YouTube community at large—has rallied around Grace as a creator: Her new channel already has over 230,000 subscribers (JOIN US). This is Tim’s real sister.
Meanwhile, the DailyGrace channel, which will now feature reruns of old Grace videos for which she will be (I assume) paid nothing, has lost more than 100,000 subscribers in the past week. This is Tim’s corporate entity sister.
Here’s the lesson: Many corporations think that by owning YouTube channels, they’ll have something valuable. But the value is not in the channel or in the number of subscribers. On YouTube, despite the corporatization of everything, the value is in people.
I’m not a DailyGrace fan. I’m a Grace Helbig fan. And at least on YouTube, the individual still has more power than the corporation. 
That’s worth celebrating. 
p.s. Subscribe to Grace! (The person, not the corporate entity.)

fishingboatproceeds:

So for those unfamiliar with the situation: Grace Helbig is a brilliant online video creator and could until recently be found at the DailyGrace channel.

But that channel, and all the videos on it, were not owned by Grace. They were owned by a company, My Damn Channel.

Now, in order to have ownership and control over her stuff, she has to leave the channel that she built up to 2.5 million subscribers and start over on YouTube. 

But her viewers—and the YouTube community at large—has rallied around Grace as a creator: Her new channel already has over 230,000 subscribers (JOIN US). This is Tim’s real sister.

Meanwhile, the DailyGrace channel, which will now feature reruns of old Grace videos for which she will be (I assume) paid nothing, has lost more than 100,000 subscribers in the past week. This is Tim’s corporate entity sister.

Here’s the lesson: Many corporations think that by owning YouTube channels, they’ll have something valuable. But the value is not in the channel or in the number of subscribers. On YouTube, despite the corporatization of everything, the value is in people.

I’m not a DailyGrace fan. I’m a Grace Helbig fan. And at least on YouTube, the individual still has more power than the corporation. 

That’s worth celebrating. 

p.s. Subscribe to Grace! (The person, not the corporate entity.)

(via wilwheaton)

What is Tumblr?

No, seriously. Someone please explain how to make the most out of this thing, because I really don’t get how it adds to my life.

Why do you like Tumblr? What should I be doing with it? Who should I follow?

And where the hell did this gif thing come from?

Daily Grace is Dead - Long Live Grace

edwardspoonhands:

So for reasons that Grace is too classy to complain about, she’s no longer going to be uploading to the Daily Grace YouTube channel. A channel that, it turns out, she never owned and, in fact, all of the content that she produced there over the last three years is also not owned by her.

Not…

Goals for the New Year (It's What All the Cool Kids Are Doing)

One of my goals is to blog more. Another to figure out how Tumblr works. Find out the rest at the link above, and let me know what your goals are (and maybe offer me some tips for using this damn website).

Writing tip.

moniquill:

ronstormer:

Thanks for your opinion. It’s wonderful that in this day and age, we can so quickly quip and call each other names.

What you said was well-worded and inspirational, but I believe it is wrong.

“Because being a writer isn’t some magical lauded state of…

(Source: ramoorebooks, via fixyourwritinghabits)

mrwritermonkey:

favorite scene ever cause she didn’t even know how accurate she was 

(via katiebienvenue)

Can we just talk about the fact that, in “The Stolen Earth”, when everyone else is having a panic attack because the Daleks are coming, Rose just picks up her gun and walks out into the streets of London.

This is why she is my favorite companion.

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